On Debian and Mint, and why I like them

I got carried away answering a comment again, but I’m going to leave my reply intact and just make it a post, because I think this question and answer are addressing a barrier to entry point in the Linux world–namely, choosing a distro. This isn’t an attempt to actually answer the whole question, it just explains some opinions.

TL;DR: If you’re new and you’re picking your first distro, I suggest Ubuntu-based Mint (not Debian-based because you have to pick through a lot of Ubuntu Mint docs for it to find the right stuff). Debian is well-loved by a lot of programmers because the design is clean and easy to build on and customize until you’ve worn your own groove into it, so if you’re not new and you’re playing around with distros, try Debian if you haven’t already–it’s a classic.

 

kirisky asked:

Hi, Rebekah!
May I know why you like Debian?

Sure thing! Debian is well-loved because it’s solid. It’s sensible. It doesn’t include weird design decisions (unless you count the more recent versions of GNOME, the window manager, which some people don’t like–but you can always just install Cinnamon instead and use that. More on window managers in a minute). Both Debian and my other favorite, Mint, have good package managers, they run a lot of stuff natively, they’re easy to debug, they’re comfy to code on, they’re well maintained and documented… just overall they’re well kept and pleasant to use.

To a geek, Debian is the epitome of “we’re just gonna let you do your own thing.” Debian provides a solid base for whatever workflow customization you like. Even if you don’t care to change things, Debian has this clean, restrained design that’s pleasant to use. I’m using language that sounds like graphic design, because I’ve been hanging around designers lately, but I’m actually not talking about visual design.

I’d describe Mint as “friendly.” It’s a comfortable operating system. It’s like the friend who, you show up at their house and they’re wearing a clean but well-loved pair of jeans and an old band T-shirt, and they have chocolate chip cookies. Maybe the house is a little cluttered, but it feels lived-in.

If you’re asking because you want to try Linux for the first time, I’d recommend Mint. Debian is a very geek-oriented system, and sometimes Mint can be a little easier to handle because it’s specifically designed for its user friendliness. Debian is really nice for programmers though.

I’ll also warn you that there’s a third operating system called Debian Mint. Most people, when they talk about “Mint,” mean Ubuntu-based Mint. Debian Mint is a hybrid kind of system where people have taken Mint and tried to take it back to its Debian roots. I know, sounds confusing. Here’s the history.

Ubuntu is based off Debian. It was, and is, a very successful effort to make Debian more approachable to total newbies. Some of the design decisions in Ubuntu weren’t too well liked by the older programmers (well, you can’t please everyone), so they kept using Debian, which is of course still maintained as its own thing. Mint is based off Ubuntu, and it’s just generally well-loved–I’ve never heard anyone rag on Mint. But people have tried to scale back some of the design characteristics it inherited from Ubuntu. Personally, I’m not exactly clear what those are, but it resulted in Debian Mint. From what I understand, it’s stable, and I think I tried it on a VM at one point? But I wouldn’t recommend it as your first, for the simple reason that trying to find *Debian* Mint documentation among all the *Ubuntu* Mint stuff is kind of a pain when you’re trying to set things up. Sure, some of the Ubuntu Mint stuff will work for Debian Mint, but it’s hard to tell the difference between the stuff that will and won’t work immediately, especially if you’re new.

If you’re confused about the term “window manager,” let me clear it up here. The window manager is basically every part of the Linux user interface that ISN’T the command line. Linux can totally be run just via the command line, and you can do some basic stuff like edit text files and change configuration settings and even write programs without ever booting up to a graphic interface. This is because, unlike Windows, the window manager is a totally separate program! So you can pick one you like. There are window managers that put everything in tiles, so instead of a desktop you have to learn to use some keyboard commands to bring up and position stuff. There are window managers that look basically like Windows 7 but cleaner; Cinnamon is one of the nicer ones. Here’s what it looks like as of May 2017 (image is a link to the post it came from). Isn’t it nice looking? It’s got a search bar. Those buttons on the side of the menu are customizable, if I remember right; you can put your favorite stuff in there.

Ugh, I’m drooling, this is making me want to go back to Mint. I wonder if it’d handle my stupid NVIDIA graphics card better than Debian did? Maybe. (Long story. Not really Debian’s fault it can’t handle the extremely odd hoops NVIDIA makes you jump through to make its proprietary drivers work. I bought too new of a card, so the open source drivers were still crappy. Anyway.)

So, I hope that answers your question, kirisky, and hopefully someone else’s too.

Happy hacking!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s