My war with NVIDIA, and what I’m working on now

So, I have a new graphics card. But.

I made the perhaps questionable decision of a) getting a NVIDIA card, and b) getting a fairly new one. On a Linux system. My research had turned up the idea that this wouldn’t matter. Popular opinion, what are you doing letting me down like this?

Anyway. Six hours of trying to install proprietary drivers, disabling nouveau, getting black screens on startup, fiddling with the BIOS, and reinstalling the operating system, and going through exactly the same process later…

I remembered that my school provides Windows 10 licenses for free and I was planning to dual boot this system anyway because I need the Adobe suite for my graphic design class. (Which is expensive, but I’m sort of loving it. Adobe and I have a love-hate relationship and always have, but I’m learning all its weird quirks and overblown UIs and giving it a little more patience. It turns out I’m a really good graphic designer. I think I could get a job with this. Maybe it’s the fact that my teacher is really good, but I seem to pick this stuff up really quickly. Vector graphics are a lot of fun.)

So. Windows is working for now. And apart from my nerd annoyance at its lack of a good command line, I’m ok with using it until I have the time to fight NVIDIA again and get Linux installed on the other half of my terabyte drive.

I’m actually working on some web design stuff right now. I’m running out of college money (and frankly kind of getting impatient with the educational system again… long time readers will know that school and I have never exactly agreed with each other). So in true LGL fashion, I went online to catch up on a bunch of web design stuff that’s developed since I last really studied it on my own. And hoo boy, there’s a lot. Responsive design is a big thing and that’s what I’m working on learning.

The web design is my personal portfolio site. My educational and work history is a little weird, so I figure if I want a job I should skip through the paper credentials and showcase the much more convincing argument that I can actually build and make stuff. It’s hard to hire programmers precisely because paper credentials aren’t that convincing. So I’m pulling together some of my better (read: finished) designs and code and artwork and showcasing ’em.

I’m building the site from the ground up. Of course I could use Drupal or WordPress, but anyone can use the basics of those systems. I want to show off.

I’m using the Brackets code editor, another anomaly for me. I started building the site in my usual bare-bones text editor… but I kept hearing about Brackets. It’s basically an IDE, except simpler because it’s specifically for web and basically the thing it does differently is that it has a live preview of your site. This makes it about 10x easier to design something when you’re still tinkering with it. And it’s made by Adobe, but it looks a lot like Atom. It doesn’t have a whole load of crusty UI junk.

So, this is the post of “how the heck did I get here?”. Me, using Windows, using an IDE made by Adobe… well. Not usual.

On the other hand! Windows doesn’t have a problem with NVIDIA’s graphics card, so I finally got to play Slime Rancher. Which is a fun game, even if it gave me simulation sickness until I messed with the view settings and finally got used to it.

I’ll fight the driver issue later, when I have the time and energy to do so. I still really want Debian or at least Mint on this system. It’s just so much easier to program when you’ve got bash–installing tools and languages, using git, keeping projects organized… I’m sure I could program on Windows if I wanted to, but it’s just not the same. Web design doesn’t count, that’s basically all through the browser so it doesn’t matter.

I want to get back to the thing I’m working on, so I’ll keep this short. What are you guys busy making right now? I know you’re smarty-pantses, so have a brag in the comments below. I’d love to hear about it.

Happy hacking,

RAY

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Box Project #2: Guess what I’m using to write this post!

Hint: it’s not something I got at Best Buy (except for the power supply, monitor, and keyboard anyway), and it’s definitely running Debian.

So, my build worked first time! I put the fire extinguisher away after it passed the smoke test. (Safety precaution. I didn’t actually expect it to burst into flames, but, well, you never know.)

The only thing that didn’t immediately work was one of the case fans, which I saw in the BIOS wasn’t on. I opened up the case again, rechecked the connection, and I don’t know if it’s on right now (I’ll probably check at some point) but nothing seems to be hot and bothered so I call that a result. It’s surprisingly quiet, too! You have to really listen to hear either the case fans or the stock CPU cooler. I guess they’re better than they used to be. Of course using an Antec case does help. It was really nice to work with, especially compared to Take Apart A Computer Day (which I wrote about earlier). Though, I don’t know if the computers sold whole to schools are actually meant to be taken apart. Probably you’re just supposed to buy 50 new computers. -_- Although I think assembly is just easier than disassembly, and for good reason, or computers would just fall apart in shipping.

I was pleasantly surprised by the number of Steam games in my library that are actually compatible with Debian. I’ll be asking for a graphics card for Christmas though–integrated graphics really can’t handle Don’t Starve and some of the other stuff in my library. It can, however, handle Cave Story+ perfectly, a game I haven’t played in years. (Classic RPGs tend not to demand much of graphics cards.) I missed Cave Story. Years ago I beat the Hell levels (several times, actually) because I was just That Determined to save Curly Brace. And then I did it again in Curly Mode, to find all the secrets. If you haven’t played this game, you need to. There’s a free version available for download online and there’s a Steam version (which may or may not still support Mac, I’m not sure.)

It’s okay that my box can’t handle the other games immediately, though. After all, my MacBook still works, although compared with the sleekness of the new rig it feels outdated and sounds asthmatic. I haven’t tried working on digital art yet with it, but I’m working on getting that set up. It’d help if more of these multi-platform programmers knew what a package manager was, though. >.< They go through the trouble to port to Linux and then they go “download here!!!”. I wanted to hear “the command is apt-get install whatever” — even if I had to add an aptitude source — the random .deb packages are not so helpful! (Edit: I miiiight have figured out how to do this. Not sure yet.)

I picked up and put down several assembly guides over the course of the project, but this one is the best I found: https://choosemypc.net/assemblyguide/

Other tips:

  • Install the motherboard port shield the right way up before getting confused about why the mobo isn’t fitting. I spent two minutes trying to figure out what was wrong and another five feeling really dumb.
  • I cut some cardboard from the box my case came in to put down on my workspace so my coffee table wouldn’t get scratched, and another piece to kneel on because a) it’s comfortable to have some padding and b) my apartment is all carpet and I was hoping it’d reduce the static.
  • I used an ice cube tray to separate screws. There are lots of screws and you don’t need them all. My extras are in a pickle jar along with the tube of thermal compound, the extra hard drive brackets, my green sticks, the protector cover that comes on the motherboard over the processor contacts, etc etc.
  • There aren’t instructions on which screws are used for what. You have to guess. My motherboard used two types of screws in different holes, too. Just be careful with your trial and error.
  • Sometimes Google is better at finding stuff in your motherboard manual than you are. Manuals are online, and it took me forever to find where you’re supposed to plug in the power button and reset and stuff–it’s easily overlooked in the manual but search is good at finding it.
  • Don’t be afraid to slide a side panel back on (to keep your cat out) and get some sleep. Even letting it sit for a few days isn’t going to hurt it if you can make sure it won’t be disturbed.
  • It helps to have a frozen dinner ready in your freezer that evening. Either it’ll take you a while because it’s your first time, and you’ll be tired and need a break and food and not want to cook, or you’ll have a new computer and you’ll want to set it up right away.
  • Fiddle with the buttons on your monitor until you can get it to auto-adjust or otherwise cooperate with your OS.
  • A wired connection, at least at first, doesn’t hurt. I tried one of those wireless USB adapter sticks and I don’t think it’s going to help. Debian doesn’t know what it is. I figured that was a nonfree driver issue, but it has bizarre install instructions for Linux and the manufacturers maybe don’t know the difference between Fedora and Debian systems? I don’t know what’s up with that, and I may look into it later, but for now I just bought a long CAT6 cable to run around the edge of the room and be done with it.

That’s that for now. I’m really pleased with this setup, and of course I have something to brag about when I go back to classes 🙂

Box Project #1

When did computers turn into a machine with so few individual components? Feels like I’m buying chunks of the machine already partway put together.

Here’s my parts list. Only seven items.

Plenty of room for upgrades in this, I know. That’s why the case isn’t one of those ridiculously tiny things the size of a sweater box. Those things… kind of weird me out, tbh. To me a computer is a big fifty-pound thing encased in sheet metal. But I digress.

Reasoning behind the parts list:

  • Integrated graphics is fine to start with. I’m not a rabid gamer. I could go out and buy someone’s 18-month-old external graphics card if I decided it wasn’t good enough, though. The case has room.
  • There’s no Windows license included. This should be obvious. It’s going to run Debian, of course. (I’ve had Elementary OS on a partition on my laptop for months… I’m kinda neutral on it. Shrug.) Windows might get a VM or a corner of the hard drive if my school has it for free, but otherwise…
  • Processor is quad-core, decent speed but not the fastest available. I like my VMs. The fans it comes with should be fine since I don’t feel the need to overclock it.
  • Antec case because I’m not a masochist–I want something nice to work in. It’s a sleek, sort of minimalist black, no weird lights or anything–and it’s $48 from Amazon.
  • A solid Antec power supply with the 80+ eco-whatever certification that means it’s efficient. I’ve had enough issues with laptop power supplies that I’m just super done with cheapness in this component.
  • 8GB RAM is solid enough for a Linux box, although there’s obviously room for upgrades. If I were building this to run mainly Windows I’d want 16GB.
  • Terabyte hard drive. I considered buying an SSD instead, or even a tiny one for just the operating system, but for now I’m putting that under the header of potential upgrades. They’re getting cheaper all the time, so it may be smart to wait, and this is good enough for me for now.
  • Nothing special about the CD/DVD drive. It reads, it writes, it’s $20.
  • Motherboards are kind of confusing to me. I don’t know what I’m looking for and they’re all labelled “gaming.” This one looks good though. ASUS is a good brand, it has enough RAM bays and outputs, and I’m pretty sure I looked up what the integrated graphics card was like when I picked it out months ago. My older brother (who built loads and loads of computers in the late nineties/early naughties and still takes stuff apart sometimes) thinks it looks good too so I’m running with it.

That’s my build–I’m ordering it now. It comes to about $600, which is a reasonable price for a computer where ALL the components are good quality, rather than just the ones that get showcased on the label (you ever hear a big-box computer store boast that their case and power supply are good quality? or that their computers are this upgradeable?). In other words, a “business” computer. That’s code for “it isn’t totally crap.”

Also, I don’t have to pay the Windows tax. ò_ó

I’ll let you all know when I get this done and can report on the experience and the performance of the result, so you can use or tweak my build example for your own purposes. I’ve never built a computer before but I’ve watched them being built and fixed, and lots of people are saying it’s gotten easier over the years. Anyway, I’m pretty jazzed about my new tech and this should be really neat!

Happy hacking!

 

Edit: Lucky I wasn’t being too literal when I said I was off to order it now. Martin in the comments is pointing out that I’m paying for way too much motherboard power and way too much power supply wattage. (I probably thought I was being careful when I picked these out and overestimated it.) I was not aware that there were calculators available for power supply needs–I didn’t see it in the PC building manual I bought or the online articles I read, and this seems a little on the bizarre side. If this were more my thing, I’d probably write my own, but I doubt I’ll have call to build more computers any time soon so I probably won’t be developing this skill much. Unless I go work for a repair shop or something, cleaning viruses and bad virus software out of PCs, and end up in that department. (Something I considered doing earlier this year.)

Anyway. I punched in the specs into the Cooler Master calculator and…

That is decidedly not a 650W kind of need. I’m going to try a couple of these calculators just to be sure but… uh. I think a cheaper power supply might be in order.

Edit #2: Newegg’s calculator says 400W for this build. I think a 500W with good efficiency will do it then…? Again, lots of potential upgrades. I don’t want to repurchase this component.

Edit #3: New build here. I added some trimmings and necessities so I don’t forget them. Also added a Mac keyboard, which I like because they’re aluminum, you can get keyboard condoms for them, they feel good to type on, and I don’t have to fight different muscle memory impulses for my laptop and desktop re: command vs. control. Worth $50 as long as it works correctly. My keyboard cover on my MacBook has saved my keys from all kinds of junk gumming them up.

Personal: On learning to be healthy again.

It’s been a while, hackers.

Depression is a sneaky little bastard. At some point during the last two years–I’m not sure when–my antidepressant stopped working. Yes, that can happen. This spring, I had to sacrifice my classes to work on treating my mental health and finding a medication that works. Again.

Of course, I didn’t realize immediately that it had stopped working. After all, I’d been on the same one for three years. I just thought I needed a higher dose of what I was already on, because the winter weather was getting to me and seasonal affective disorder is like that grumpy aunt who always visits around Christmas and never has anything good to say about you.

I eventually had an epiphany: there wasn’t actually anything very stressful about the situation I was in, and there wasn’t anything wrong with me personally. I realized that the medication had actually stopped working somewhere along the line and I’d started running to keep up with what I assumed were more stressful external circumstances, and then berating myself for being unable to keep up with them. To be fair, I had been dealing with some nasty drama with the community college, then I was looking for a transfer university, then I was moving, then I was adjusting to having moved away from my family. It wasn’t an unreasonable assumption.

But the depression hung around, because somewhere in this mess I stopped getting the chemicals that I (and every human being on the planet, whether they buy store-bought like I do or their brain is capable of producing its own) rely on to have a functional brain.

It is not normal to get anxiety attacks when approaching assignments or going to class. It is not normal to lack the mental focus required to study. It is not normal to lack the physical energy required to leave your house more than once a week. It is not normal to struggle to eat a decent meal every day because you’re not at all hungry and forgot to eat. It is not normal to think, “I need to do this thing, I want to do this thing, I have the energy and ability to do this thing” and lack the executive function to actually get up and do it.

It is not normal for someone who normally has a programmer’s memory–you know, the kind of person who doesn’t use grocery lists–to forget most of what they did that day. Did I do this today or yesterday or the day before–or not at all? (Maybe I just thought really hard about it.) Have I taken my medication today? Have I eaten? When did I shower? What day of the week is it?

That’s not normal. See a doctor.

When I finally started trying new meds, I thought I knew the drill: you try one for 6-8 weeks, and it may work or it may not.

I was mistaken in a few different ways; the good news was that as long as I was trying new SSRIs, the trial period could be cut down to 4 weeks because when you go from one SSRI to another, the new one starts working faster. The bad news is that “working” and “not working” are not the only options. There’s also “backfiring.”

That was what happened with the first new medication I tried. I can’t remember if I actually got the flu during that month (depression memory is very foggy), but for several weeks I felt like I had it all the same. I barely had the energy–the physical energy–to stand, let alone go to class.

Fortunately, the next one actually worked. I was pleasantly surprised; I had been expecting to go through four or five duds. Not only did it work, I started feeling better in about a week. That’s what I’m taking now.

I’ve taken a retroactive medical withdrawal on all my classes (I’ll skip over the running around and bureaucracy and piles of paperwork I had to get through to get that done) and now I have actual energy and am making stuff and doing things again.

I had completely forgotten what being creative and energetic and functional was like. For a while, it was so different that I sort of didn’t trust my brain about it. I was expecting some kind of crash.

I’d been down for so long I’d forgotten what normal was, and coming back to normal confused me. Can I actually run on 8 hours of sleep instead of 12? Since when do I have the energy to do things all day instead of having to choose a maximum of three tasks to cross off my list? I was worried I was hypomanic.

 

It’s funny, because I do have a therapist through the school. I don’t really need her because I don’t have the kind of shame and unhealthy thought processes that plague a lot of people, mentally ill or not–and this is what a therapist works with patients on changing–and my depression happens to be purely chemical and genetic. (Though her services are free to me, and she was helpful in getting the mountain of paperwork to pass the office.) She’s off for the summer and I actually needed her more to help cope with being healthy than I needed her help to cope with being depressed.

You know, for a while I wondered if someone like me should not be trying to found a company. I’ve never really discussed that in previous blog posts, I know a few of you were probably thinking it, and I know some people on the Internet are like “I would never hire someone with mental illness in a startup.” But the thing about that is… founders end up with mental illness all the time. Depression, anxiety, bipolar, OCD, eating disorders… the stress of starting a company plays a big role in either developing or bringing to the surface all kinds of mental illnesses. You may not hear about it, but if you read enough books (not articles, books) in the industry, then you’ll run into this. (In particular I want to recommend this one. Not an affiliate link.) The difference is that I know what mine is, I’m aware of it, I know how to treat it, I even know what it looks like when treatment fails. This is not a defect. This is an edge.

Finally.

I’m doing stuff again, and I have several projects I’m working on now. I attended TechWeek in Chicago (I’ll be writing about it but spoiler alert: not worth it). I’ve also started learning React. And right now, I’m pretty stoked about the fact that I now have the funds to build my desktop computer. Yeah, you heard that right. I’m gonna tag the posts “box project”. Keep an eye out for it.

Let’s go make stuff.

——

Update, Nov 2017: my new meds still work way better. Keep at it, hackers. Don’t give up.

Take Apart A Computer: Follow-Up Post

(If you’re here because you want to know what to do with your shiny new Linux DVD, you can skip about the first third of this.)

Today I attended Take Apart A Computer Day, hosted by the Women In Computing club here at UNI. This was kind of a beta test run for a potentially larger event later on.

I worked together with two other girls (if you ladies are reading and want your names here, let me know–but I don’t generally mention names on this blog unless asked, for people’s privacy) on a huge old box. We have no clue if it worked beforehand (the consensus after two professors and all three of us took a crack at testing it was no), but it definitely isn’t working now, so I guess that’s a success. After all, the event isn’t called “Put a Computer Back Together in Full Working Order Day,” and we did get it apart. Eventually.

So, we learned a couple things from the beta run for next time:

  1. Test all the machines beforehand–after moving them.
  2. The test monitors that the computers also need to be tested on a known working box, so we know our testers work. Nothing like screwy monitor settings to make you crazy wondering what’s up with the computer.
  3. Two people is probably a good number for working on a computer together… three is a bit much. Having a partner makes things easier, but six hands is pretty awkward even if the people are friendly.
  4. WHERE IS THE RIGHT SCREWDRIVER. WHAT EVEN IS THE RIGHT SCREWDRIVER. NONE OF THESE SCREWDRIVERS WORK. HOW.
  5. Juice boxes! Yes, this is kind of a tradition with me now: bring juice into a place where it would be very bad to spill juice. But they were still all consumed! On the other hand, we need more people willing to take home pizza that’s been sitting out for a few hours…
  6. Having extra Linux install DVDs to hand out is a good thing! Not necessary, but good–people are curious!

Anyway, I’m sending this post around the WIC mailing list (er… Google group? It’s different from the CedarLUG list, which is legitimately an old-fashioned mailing list). About five of you folks from this event now have Linux test/install DVDs. If I remember right, I handed out a Xubuntu, a Mint, two versions of Debian, and… something else? Maybe that was it.

I’m pretty sure I’ve used each of them at one point, and they should all work even if they’re not all the newest and greatest; I think they’re all the long-term-stable releases so they’ll be fine. If they don’t work for whatever reason, don’t sweat it; email me or whatever and I’ll make more, or if you have blank DVDs lying around (or are willing to buy a pack for $5 at an office supply store), you can make one.

 

Anyway, when I give people techie stuff, I like to make sure they can easily figure out how to use it. (Doesn’t always happen, but I try to.)

So! If you’re curious about Linux and maybe just got a DVD from me, here’s a guide to all the guides I’ve written on the subject:

If you didn’t get a DVD or yours turned out to be a non-functional dud, here’s how to make one.

If you don’t have an optical drive in your computer, or want a more permanent plaything than the DVD, here’s how to make a virtual machine instead.

If you’re confused about the Linux ecosystem, here’s how I learned what I know.

If you’re just confused, period, here’s the FAQ I wrote for another event which involved lots of Linux newbies.

If you just want to run Linux off your DVD to play with it a little, it’s simple. Stick it in the optical drive of your computer, and restart the computer. While it boots, tap F12 (it’s probably F12, but keep an eye out for what key you’re supposed to press for menu options during your computer’s boot sequence) and select “Boot from CD/DVD” in the menu.

The difference between doing that and making a virtual machine is that a virtual machine will save any files you create from session to session (unless you do magic to configure it otherwise). An install DVD won’t save anything, so you get a fresh, clean system every time you start it up.

If that’s not working for you, email me in the list or comment on this post and I’ll try to help. If that still doesn’t work for you, bring the offending computer to the next WIC meeting if it’s portable (let me know what you’re doing so I make sure to come), or invite me over to your place if it’s not/if you can’t attend the meeting. I will help you get a Linux running if that’s something you want.

I’ve installed Linux on some weird old machines and gotten at least workable solutions out of them. Sometimes a setting needs to be tweaked or Google needs to be scoured for information. Sometimes a certain distro just doesn’t like your hardware, and you need to try a different one or download extra driver files or plug your computer into a wired Internet connection or something weird. Such is technology.

That’s usually not the case though. Most installs these days go really smoothly, especially with Mint or Xubuntu.

Speaking of installs, CedarLUG–UNI’s Linux Users Group–is holding a Backup Day pretty soon, and an Install Day sometime after that. If you want in on that, here’s the web site (I coded that! The penguin at the top is a bit of a giveaway…). Subscribing to that mailing list will get you updates on those events, and the occasional computer puzzle.

Happy Linux-ing!

How to make a Linux CD

A CD or DVD with Linux on it is a useful thing to have! There are quite a few things you can do with it:

  • You can try Linux out without installing it. Just putting the CD in the optical drive and running Linux from there won’t touch your main operating system or files. Using it like this can actually help you fix a Windows computer–you can still access the hard drive and back up all the files that are on it from Linux even if Windows is acting weird. (You can also use it to kind of crack into your machine if you’ve been locked out for some reason, but don’t try it on a network because the sysadmin will notice and flip out. You didn’t hear this from me.)
  • You can install Linux alongside or instead of your main OS–be careful about your files if you’re doing a wipe-and-install, of course, and be careful about partitioning your drive too. Make sure you have a backup of at least everything important if you do it this way!
  • You can also install Linux on a virtual machine, although using the .iso file you download from the Internet and burn to the CD works just as well for this.

So how do you make one? It’s pretty easy:

Get yourself a blank CD or DVD.

Some distros won’t fit on a CD and you’ll have to use a DVD. If you don’t know what this means yet, get a DVD.

Pick a Linux distribution (or “distro”).

There are lots of different “flavors” of Linux. They might look a little different, or be designed for special systems or specific groups of users.

If you’re new to all this, I suggest Mint or Xubuntu. They look a lot like Windows, so they’ll seem familiar, but they’re way better! And they’re a breeze to install. Normal Ubuntu I wouldn’t recommend as a first distro, actually; the user interface it comes with is kind of clunky. The only difference Xubuntu has is that it looks simpler and that makes it a little easier to use.

If you’re curious or you’ve tried this before, try searching around for a distro that’s particularly suited to you. I’m quite fond of Debian, but I’ve been playing with Elementary, which looks more like Mac OS X than the normal Windowsy-looking interfaces.

Mint and Xubuntu are great general-purpose distros. Xubuntu is probably the better one on older computers–I’ve made a ten-year-old box on two gigs of RAM run like a decent computer by installing Xubuntu. If your computer is THAT old, you’ll want 32-bit; otherwise, use 64-bit.

A word about some terms you’ll see. Unless you’re developing or testing for the distro as a project–in other words, if you’re a normal user–you won’t want to use the development versions. Anything that says “nightly release” or whatever, stay away from using as a main operating system because it’s still in testing.

“LTS” means “long term stable.” That is a GOOD thing to download. It may not be the very most recent version, but it’s a well-tested one that’s going to be supported for a reasonably long time.

You can also just get the most recent stable release. Those or LTS releases will be fine.

Download the .iso file

Either from the Internet directly or as a torrent. Googling the name of your distro should make it pop up. Where possible, always use a download link suggested on the project web site. There are probably multiple “mirrors” to download from; try to choose one that is on the same continent as you.

Any computer with 4 gigs of RAM or more should be using 64-bit operating systems. That’s probably what you want unless your computer is really old.

If this is your first time, I’ll make it easy on you. Here’s the download page for the latest Mint (64-bit, Cinnamon desktop), and here’s the download page for Xubuntu.

A torrent is a more reliable way of getting a distro if you have a torrent client set up. They’ll keep going even if they’re interrupted, and they’re less expensive for the maintainers. However, the clients are kind of tricky to set up, at least in my experience. There’s nothing wrong or sketchy about torrenting Linux distros–you can use torrent clients to get hold of sketchy Internet stuff, but that’s not what we’re doing here, this is super innocent and it’s just another way to get your .iso file.

Burn the .iso file to the CD

You probably know how to do this on your computer. If not, Google it. It’s pretty simple.

Label the CD, and maybe put it in a paper sleeve

Lots of people forget to do this, and it’s really confusing! Make sure you mark your CD with the distro name (e.g. Linux Mint), the version number (e.g. 18), and whether it’s 32- or 64-bit (probably 64).

Optional but fun: Burn more CDs for your friends

Self-explanatory.

“Did you get it to do that thing you were trying?”

“I figured out how to install programs!”

“I found a tutorial about the command line!”

“My resolution is acting funny, anyone have ideas about that?”

This is why Linux User Groups exist. Get enough nerds in one room playing with a shiny toy and something fun is going to happen.

 

Happy hacking!

New toy?

Kotlin

I read about this language on Medium, and I’ll let you go read that instead of writing about it here. Basically, it’s trying to be Java cleaned up, with all the libraries and support and the JVM intact. I have no clue how well that’s working.

In addition to the features listed in that article, semicolons are optional in Kotlin–and it’s kind of funny-sad how keen the web site is to point this feature out.